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Defining DeutschtumPolitical Ideology, German Identity, and Music-Critical Discourse in Liberal Vienna$
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David Brodbeck

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199362707

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.001.0001

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Becoming a German

Becoming a German

Goldmark and the Assimilationist Project

Chapter:
(p.53) Chapter Two Becoming a German
Source:
Defining Deutschtum
Author(s):

David Brodbeck

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.003.0003

This chapter considers the emergence of Carl Goldmark’s self-perception as a German artist. It begins with Goldmark’s youth in the West-Hungarian Jewish ghetto of Deutschkreuz and carries his biography forward to his early career in Vienna. Coverage includes his relationships with his brother Joseph (active in the Revolution of 1848) and the Germanized Jewish writer Eduard Kulke, and his work as a music critic for the liberal Constitutionelle oesterreichische Zeitung and as the conductor of a Viennese Jewish singing society. Finally, it suggests a new way of understanding an episode from the end of the century in which Brahms has generally been understood to have made a tasteless antisemitic remark.

Keywords:   Ghetto, Deutschkreuz, Joseph Goldmark, Eduard Kulke, Constitutionelle oesterreichische Zeitung, Johannes Brahms

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