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Defining DeutschtumPolitical Ideology, German Identity, and Music-Critical Discourse in Liberal Vienna$
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David Brodbeck

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199362707

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.001.0001

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Hanslick’s Deutschtum

Hanslick’s Deutschtum

Chapter:
(p.25) Chapter One Hanslick’s Deutschtum
Source:
Defining Deutschtum
Author(s):

David Brodbeck

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.003.0002

This chapter explores Eduard Hanslick’s youth and intellectual development in German-speaking yet nationally indifferent Vormärz Prague and the eventual development of his sensibility as a moderate German liberal. It considers his early critical writings for the Prague literary journal Ost und West as well as his settings for voice and piano of two Czech texts, including one by Ferdinand Mikovec that the poet used in a play that carried Czech meaning. It concludes with an examination of Hanslick’s political writings from Vienna during the revolutionary year of 1848. Some of these appeared in Leopold Hasner’s Prager Zeitung. Others, including a striking essay on the status of the Jews in the Habsburg realm that bears comparison with Richard Wagner’s “Jewry in Music,” appeared in the Wiener Zeitung.

Keywords:   Chapter keywords, Vormärz Prague, Ost und West, Ferdinand Mikovec, Leopold Hasner, Richard Wagner, “Jewry in Music”

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