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Defining DeutschtumPolitical Ideology, German Identity, and Music-Critical Discourse in Liberal Vienna$
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David Brodbeck

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199362707

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.001.0001

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Viennese Critics and the “Habsburg Dilemma”

Viennese Critics and the “Habsburg Dilemma”

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction Viennese Critics and the “Habsburg Dilemma”
Source:
Defining Deutschtum
Author(s):

David Brodbeck

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.003.0001

The Introduction offers an overview of Austrian history during the second half of the nineteenth century, showing how the defeated liberal nationalists of 1848 eventually rose to power by the beginning of the constitutional era in the 1860s but then later came under challenge from the opposing forces of Czech nationalism and racialist antisemitism. It introduces the city’s leading music-performance venues, its leading political newspapers, and its most important music critics, associating each with the ideological positions he held in the spectrum from liberal nationalism to national liberalism to radical German nationalism and discusses what that means in terms of the question of Germanness in music.

Keywords:   1848, Constitutional era, Czech nationalism, antisemitism, 1 Hanslick’s Deutschtum

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