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Standing ApartMormon Historical Consciousness and the Concept of Apostasy$
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Miranda Wilcox and John D. Young

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199348138

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199348138.001.0001

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Apostasy’s Ancestors

Apostasy’s Ancestors

Anti-Arian and Anti-Mormon Discourse in the Struggle for Christianity

Chapter:
(p.218) 9 Apostasy’s Ancestors
Source:
Standing Apart
Author(s):

Ariel Bybee Laughton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199348138.003.0009

This chapter evaluates the mixed legacy of the Mormon scholar Hugh Nibley, an influential interpreter of LDS ideas about the Christian apostasy in the second half of the twentieth century. It offers a comparative case study of how the discourses of heresy waged against Arian Christians in the late fourth century and against Mormons in the twenty-first century involved more political maneuvering and social boundary-making than theological divergences. In the process, it models how LDS scholars might employ critical methodologies and build on Nibley’s legacy of posing provocative disciplinary questions while engaging the LDS community in academic conversations about early Christianity.

Keywords:   Hugh Windor Nibley, apologetics, Ambrose, Robert Jeffress, Arianism, anti-Mormonism, church history, religious identity

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