Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Standing ApartMormon Historical Consciousness and the Concept of Apostasy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Miranda Wilcox and John D. Young

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199348138

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199348138.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 July 2019

“Complexity and Richness”

“Complexity and Richness”

Reenvisioning the Middle Ages for Mormon Historical Narratives

Chapter:
(p.242) 10 “Complexity and Richness”
Source:
Standing Apart
Author(s):

Spencer E. Young

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199348138.003.0010

This chapter reveals that the LDS characterization of the Middle Ages as a period of spiritual darkness is inadequate given the complexity and richness of religious experience among medieval Christians. It examines the oft-disparaged late medieval practice of indulgences in the context of the Catholic theology of salvation and compares it with the sometimes controversial LDS practice of performing ordinances for the dead. In the process, the chapter identifies similarities and differences between medieval and Mormon conceptions of the soteriological necessity of reciprocal relations between the living and the dead.

Keywords:   Middle Ages, indulgences, Alexander Morrison, Tad R. Callister, baptism for the dead, treasury of merits doctrine, exempla collections, soteriology, James L. Barker

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .