Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Are You Not a Man of God?Devotion, Betrayal, and Social Criticism in Jewish Tradition$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Tova Hartman and Charlie Buckholtz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199337439

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199337439.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 August 2019

“Beruriah Said Well”: The Many Lives (and Deaths) of a Talmudic Social Critic

“Beruriah Said Well”: The Many Lives (and Deaths) of a Talmudic Social Critic

Chapter:
(p.82) 3 “Beruriah Said Well”: The Many Lives (and Deaths) of a Talmudic Social Critic
Source:
Are You Not a Man of God?
Author(s):

Tova Hartman

Charlie Buckholtz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199337439.003.0004

This chapter examines the iconic Talmudic figure Beruriah, a learned woman from an esteemed rabbinic family who finds herself repeatedly shocked by what she sees as a gap between the core values of the tradition and the thoughtless and/or irresponsible ways in which she experiences the rabbis treating her and others. It explains that the dominant modern reading of Beruriah presents her as a as a kind of proto-liberal feminist and highlights her accomplishment in gaining access to the world of men as a female scholar. This article offers an alternative interpretation which emphasizes Beruriah’s critique of some of their more systemic abuses of power and not her equality with her contemporary culture-hero counterparts.

Keywords:   Beruriah, Talmudic figure, proto-liberal feminist, female scholar, abuses of power, culture-hero counterparts

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .