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Are You Not a Man of God?Devotion, Betrayal, and Social Criticism in Jewish Tradition$
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Tova Hartman and Charlie Buckholtz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199337439

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199337439.001.0001

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“But I Grieve for My Mother”: The Betrayal of Iphigenia and Isaac

“But I Grieve for My Mother”: The Betrayal of Iphigenia and Isaac

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 “But I Grieve for My Mother”: The Betrayal of Iphigenia and Isaac
Source:
Are You Not a Man of God?
Author(s):

Tova Hartman

Charlie Buckholtz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199337439.003.0002

This chapter examines the iconic figures of Iphigenia and Isaac, two children who were raised to understand family, love, and relationship as sacred inviolable values. It explains the resistance of Iphigenia and Isaac to their fathers’ plan to sacrifice them, as duty to a nation and as obedience to God. Iphigenia reminds Agamemnon that his role as a father takes precedence over his role as a military and political leader of Greece, while Isaac reminds his father Abraham of his erstwhile devotion to the family triangle of father-mother-son. This chapter also explores some of the ways in which the lens of devoted resistance opens new layers of interpretive possibility and questions some of the core assumptions underpinning their dominant interpretive legacies.

Keywords:   Iphigenia, Isaac, children, sacrifice, resistance, Agamemnon, Abraham, interpretive legacies, family, love

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