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Saving LivesWhy the Media's Portrayal of Nursing Puts Us All at Risk$
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Sandy Summers and Harry Jacobs Summers

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199337064

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199337064.001.0001

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Who Wants Yesterday’s Girl?

Who Wants Yesterday’s Girl?

Chapter:
(p.186) 6 Who Wants Yesterday’s Girl?
Source:
Saving Lives
Author(s):

Sandy Summers

Harry Jacobs Summers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199337064.003.0006

Nursing remains more than 90 percent female. Yet much of the media created by “feminists” has been hostile to nursing. Popular Hollywood hospital shows, particularly Grey’s Anatomy, suggest that nursing is not good enough for smart modern women. Films like Akeelah and the Bee indicate that promising girls, unlike their bitter mothers, do not have to settle for nursing. The media can be open to the idea of men in nursing, but it has also mocked male nurses. TNT’s Rizzoli & Isles spent a 2010 episode jeering at a male nurse for wanting to be a “stay-at-home-daddy” and for being an ugly caricature of a traditional woman. On ABC’s Private Practice, a male nurse worked as a clinic receptionist, became a midwife, then proudly announced that he had been admitted to medical school. Too much of the media still defines success in terms of traditionally male jobs, such as medicine.

Keywords:   nursing, feminism, media feminists, careers for women, female physicians/doctors, gender roles, male nurses, murses, nursing recruitment, nursing diversity

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