Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Triumph in DefeatMilitary Loss and the Roman Republic$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jessica H. Clark

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199336548

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199336548.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 May 2020

Costs and Benefits

Costs and Benefits

Winning the Second Punic War

Chapter:
(p.50) 2 Costs and Benefits
Source:
Triumph in Defeat
Author(s):

Jessica H. Clark

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199336548.003.0003

This chapter discusses Romans’ experience of the Second Punic War (218–202 B.C.E.). It first examines the major defeats that marked the opening years of the war (at the Ticinus, the Trebia, Lake Trasimene, and, most famously, Cannae) and the ways in which Romans (the Roman Senate, collectively, and individual senators in historiographic terms) responded to each of these losses. The chapter then explores the strategies, both in the field, and, as is more emphasized, at Rome, that allowed the Romans to continue the prosecution of the war until its eventual but by no means inevitable conclusion. In manning the legions and the fleet, funding the war, propitiating the gods, and addressing the concerns of its allies, the Romans showed themselves willing to go to desperate measures rather than concede in what was—importantly—not a fight to the death.

Keywords:   Roman Senate, Second Punic War, defeat, Cannae, Lake Trasimene

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .