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A Prophet Like MosesProphecy, Law, and Israelite Religion$
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Jeffrey Stackert

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199336456

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199336456.001.0001

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The Priestly and Yahwistic Sources: Separating Prophecy and Law

The Priestly and Yahwistic Sources: Separating Prophecy and Law

Chapter:
(p.168) 5 The Priestly and Yahwistic Sources: Separating Prophecy and Law
Source:
A Prophet Like Moses
Author(s):

Jeffrey Stackert

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199336456.003.0005

Neither the Priestly (P) nor Yahwistic (J) source ties its arguments to Mosaic prophecy in the ways that E and D do. Even so, P both accepts and strengthens the case against prophecy after Moses. P ensures that Moses is the only—not just the last—prophet. After Moses establishes the cult in P, there is no need for additional prophecy. Instead, the priests can effectively perform any oracular functions that might otherwise be the purview of prophets. For its part, J is entirely unconcerned with the future of prophecy after Moses. Yet it is also unconcerned with law. Thus, J correlates inversely with the pattern of the other sources: J presents no objection to prophecy and offers no legal alternative to it. The main texts treated in this chapter include Exodus 6:9–12; Exodus 34:29–35; Leviticus 24:10–23; Numbers 9:1–14; Numbers 15:32–36; and Numbers 27:1–11.

Keywords:   Priestly source, Yahwistic source, Holiness stratum, oracular novellae, Moses

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