Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Exodus and LiberationDeliverance Politics from John Calvin to Martin Luther King Jr.$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John Coffey

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199334223

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199334223.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 December 2019

“When Israel Was in Egyptland”

“When Israel Was in Egyptland”

Black Exodus Politics, 1808–1865

Chapter:
(p.145) 5 “When Israel Was in Egyptland”
Source:
Exodus and Liberation
Author(s):

John Coffey

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199334223.003.0006

This chapter explores the “discursive crossovers” that occurred as African Americans adopted and adapted the tradition of Protestant deliverance politics for their own ends. The black identification with the children of Israel was peculiarly intense, enabling African Americans to forge a scriptural identity and question the biblically constructed identity of the United States. The Exodus story was used to justify and frame armed resistance, flight, and migration. While it appealed to black intellectuals like Frederick Douglass, it also sank deep roots in popular culture, expressed in the spirituals. When it finally came, emancipation was celebrated as a providential deliverance, a new Exodus, though many recognized that the trek to the Promised Land had only begun.

Keywords:   African Americans, race, slave revolts, migration, spirituals, emancipation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .