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Resisting GenocideThe Multiple Forms of Rescue$
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Jacques Semelin, Claire Andrieu, and Sarah Gensburger

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199333493

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199333493.001.0001

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Social Cohesion and State of Exception

Social Cohesion and State of Exception

THE MUSLIMS OF MABARE DURING THE GENOCIDE IN RWANDA (APRIL 1994)

Chapter:
(p.481) 29 Social Cohesion and State of Exception
Source:
Resisting Genocide
Author(s):

Emmanuel Viret

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199333493.003.0030

This chapter examines the role of the inhabitants of the town of Mabare in the rescue of Tutsis during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. In April 1994, the people of Mabare, most of whom were Muslims, attempted to put up violent resistance to the militias that came to kill Tutsis. The genocide of the Tutsis that engulfed Rwanda for about three months was carried out in approximately ten days in Mabare. The chapter first provides an overview of Islam in Mabare before discussing the militia attacks on Tutsi refugees fleeing to Mabare and the inhabitants' organisation of resistance against the assailants. More specifically, it highlights the social cohesion displayed by the Muslims during the emergency.

Keywords:   rescue, Mabare, Tutsis, genocide, Rwanda, Muslims, militias, Islam, social cohesion, emergency

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