Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Christians and the Color LineRace and Religion after Divided by Faith$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

J. Russell Hawkins and Philip Luke Sinitiere

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199329502

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199329502.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2019

Color-Conscious Structure-Blind Assimilation: How Asian American Christians Can Unintentionally Maintain the Racial Divide

Color-Conscious Structure-Blind Assimilation: How Asian American Christians Can Unintentionally Maintain the Racial Divide

Chapter:
(p.178) 8 Color-Conscious Structure-Blind Assimilation: How Asian American Christians Can Unintentionally Maintain the Racial Divide
Source:
Christians and the Color Line
Author(s):

Jerry Z. Park

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199329502.003.0009

Surveying Asian American demographics, this chapter finds that most Asian Americans who participate in multiracial churches are highly skilled, highly educated beneficiaries of particular immigration policies and familial networks. Many white congregants of multiracial churches, however, view their Asian American coreligionists as “model minorities” who advanced in American society solely as a result of hard work and determination, ignoring the structural factors that also contributed to their success. In this way, this chapter asserts that Asian American Christians can actually unintentionally help maintain racial divides by allowing churches to have “color diversity” without critiquing the deeper structural systems at the heart of American society’s racialization. Thus, it is incumbent upon Asian Americans in multiracial churches to use their position to speak and act on the behalf of other racial minorities who continue to be impeded by America’s racialized structures.

Keywords:   Asian Americans, racial diversity, multiracial congregations, racialization, multiracial churches

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .