Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Bosnian Muslims in the Second World War$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Marko Attila Hoare

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199327850

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199327850.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 October 2019

The dual Bosnian resistance

The dual Bosnian resistance

c. April 1941–April 1943

Chapter:
(p.13) 1 The dual Bosnian resistance
Source:
The Bosnian Muslims in the Second World War
Author(s):

Marko Attila Hoare

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199327850.003.0002

The occupation of Bosnia-Hercegovina by the Axis powers, and their imposition of a brutal and unrepresentative Ustasha puppet regime on the country, provoked widespread resistance that cut across national and class borders. Just as Ustasha rule affected different sections of the Bosnian population differently, so the resistance took a multitude of forms. In the countryside, Serbs threatened with extermination took up arms and fought battles with the Ustashas; in the cities and towns, members of all nationalities - Muslims, Croats, Serbs, Jews and others - engaged in quieter forms of resistance. This ranged from workers’ acts of industrial sabotage, through women’s demonstrations against food shortages, through notables’ lobbying on behalf of political prisoners and public agitation against Ustasha crimes. The predominantly Serb guerrilla resistance in the countryside and the multinational political resistance in the cities and towns formed the two wings of the resistance. The Communists comprised the bridge between the two wings of the resistance, and were the only political force capable of uniting Bosnians of all nationalities. The Ustashas were therefore faced with two, parallel Bosnian movements of resistance to the NDH.

Keywords:   Bosnia-Hercegovina, Axis, Ustasha, Muslims, Croats, Serbs, Jews, resistance

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .