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The Law of the SeaProgress and Prospects$
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David Freestone, Richard Barnes, and David Ong

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199299614

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199299614.001.0001

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Towards an International Law for the Conservation of Offshore Hydrocarbon Resources within the Continental Shelf?

Towards an International Law for the Conservation of Offshore Hydrocarbon Resources within the Continental Shelf?

Chapter:
(p.93) 6 Towards an International Law for the Conservation of Offshore Hydrocarbon Resources within the Continental Shelf?
Source:
The Law of the Sea
Author(s):

David M Ong

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199299614.003.0006

The evolution of the modern international law of the sea has been particularly sensitive to, and influenced by, developments in scientific knowledge and technology. An obvious example of this is in the great strides made in offshore drilling and mining techniques that stimulated the development of the legal regime for exploration and exploitation of continental shelf resources, as well as latterly, the deep seabed mining regime. A more recent trend influencing the development of the law of the sea is the scientific progress made in assessing the growing threat posed by human activities to the marine environment. This has had a consequential impact on the progressive evolution of marine environmental law, which has as its main concern the application of the concept or objective of sustainable development to human activities within the marine sphere. The attainment of the ‘sustainable development’ objective within this context in turn relies at least in part on the application or implementation of the principle of sustainable use of natural resources. This chapter examines whether the sustainable use principle can also be applied to the conservation of the non-living, mineral, and especially hydrocarbon, resources of the continental shelf.

Keywords:   sea, hydrocarbon resources, continental shelf, sustainable use, sustainable development, natural resources, conservation, non-living resources, renewable energy sources, climate change

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