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The Law of the SeaProgress and Prospects$
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David Freestone, Richard Barnes, and David Ong

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199299614

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199299614.001.0001

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Reflections on the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea

Reflections on the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea

Chapter:
(p.28) 2 Reflections on the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea
Source:
The Law of the Sea
Author(s):

L Dolliver M Nelson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199299614.003.0002

The 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC) can be considered a monument to international cooperation. It is some ten years since the Convention came into force, and as of September 2005, the number of States parties had reached 149 — with ratifications and accessions in the last two years from Canada (2003), Lithuania (2003), Denmark (2004), Latvia (2004), Burkina Faso (2005), and Estonia (2005). This increasingly widespread participation can only enhance the authority of this instrument. This chapter discusses the codification of LOSC, interaction between the conference and state practice, amendments, declarations and statements, the introduction of the common heritage of mankind as a bold new concept towards developing public order of the oceans, and the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea.

Keywords:   United Nations Convention, oceans, international cooperation, codification, common heritage, International Tribunal

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