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Recovering from SuccessInnovation and Technology Management in Japan$
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D. Hugh Whittaker and Robert E. Cole

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199297320

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199297320.001.0001

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Electronic government in Japan: Towards harmony between technology solutions and administrative systems

Electronic government in Japan: Towards harmony between technology solutions and administrative systems

Chapter:
(p.286) 16 Electronic government in Japan: Towards harmony between technology solutions and administrative systems
Source:
Recovering from Success
Author(s):

Toshiro Kita

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199297320.003.0016

This chapter looks at government and policy from a different perspective. E-Government has been an important if overlooked part of the e-Japan strategy, and central to this is Juki-net. The debacle of its introduction is analysed, which was marked by initial confrontation with anti Juki-net campaigners concerned about privacy and information security, and subsequently between administrative agencies and residents, where passive resistance virtually assigned the Juki-card to oblivion. A ‘customer-oriented’ solution to the impasse is proposed, which is considered symptomatic of the whole e-Japan programme. It is shown that policy makers are as much in need of MOT education as the engineers and managers who still believe in the linear model of innovation.

Keywords:   e-Government, Juki-net, e-Japan, information security, residents' resistance, consumer-oriented solution

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