Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Recovering from SuccessInnovation and Technology Management in Japan$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

D. Hugh Whittaker and Robert E. Cole

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199297320

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199297320.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 October 2019

Innovation policy for Japan in a new era

Innovation policy for Japan in a new era

Chapter:
(p.237) 13 Innovation policy for Japan in a new era
Source:
Recovering from Success
Author(s):

Tateo Arimoto

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199297320.003.0013

Among the most prominent policy attempts to reshape Japan's innovation system has been moves to create an environment conducive to basic research and breakthrough innovations. This chapter reminds us that this is not simply a matter of strengthening university research and forging closer links between universities and industry, but requires universities to address a broad range of skill needs, particularly in professional fields like law and management, which individual companies can no longer address on their own. It is shown that social issues must also be addressed, including greater efforts to promote public understanding of and support for science and technology. This requires directing science and technology and innovation policies towards the needs of the many rather than the few. Ultimately, the necessary values and creativity have to reside in individuals.

Keywords:   innovation, Japan, basic research, universities, science and technology policy, public understanding of science

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .