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The Alamanni and Rome 213-496(Caracalla to Clovis)$
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John F. Drinkwater

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199295685

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199295685.001.0001

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Conflict 356–61

Conflict 356–61

Chapter:
(p.217) 7 Conflict 356–61
Source:
The Alamanni and Rome 213-496
Author(s):

John F. Drinkwater (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199295685.003.0008

This chapter deals with Romano-Alamannic conflict in the period when Julian campaigned in Gaul. The great interest in his activities shown by the sources and Julian's own writings provide the best extant evidence for Roman exploitation of the ‘Germanic threat’. Hostility between Julian and Constantius II's senior general in the west prevented a peaceful resolution of the earlier Alamannic incursions and allowed Julian, in need of a military reputation, deliberately to provoke the Alamanni to unite to fight him at Strasbourg in 357. They lost, and in 357, 358, 359 and 360, Julian continued to harass Franks and Alamanni to build up his strength ready for the inevitable confrontation with Constantius II. Remarkable in this is how close Julian remained to the Rhine until, still ‘pacifying’ Alamanni, he moved eastwards in 361.

Keywords:   Romano-Alamannic conflict, Constantius II, Germanic threat, Strasbourg, Julian

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