Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Alamanni and Rome 213-496(Caracalla to Clovis)$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John F. Drinkwater

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199295685

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199295685.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 July 2019

Conflict 285–355

Conflict 285–355

Chapter:
(p.177) 6 Conflict 285–355
Source:
The Alamanni and Rome 213-496
Author(s):

John F. Drinkwater (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199295685.003.0007

The Alamanni are best known for fighting Rome. This chapter examines the course of such conflict, from the arrival of Maximian in Gaul to that of Julian. Neighbouring Germani were always tempted to raid when they felt they would go unpunished. In the case of the Alamanni, such aggression may occasionally have been increased by the arrival of new war-bands from the Elbe-Germanic triangle. But no Germani ever contemplated conquering the Empire, and they were always expelled. Their ‘threat’, however, justified Roman emperors in attacking them frequently for their own political ends. Franks and Alamanni suffered most. The serious Alamannic incursions of 350-355 were probably instigated by Constantius II in order to weaken Magnentius. Constantius II, however, expected that the situation would be righted as usual, so when he sent Julian into Gaul he was not cold-bloodedly sending him to his death.

Keywords:   Constantius II, Magnentius, Alamannic incursions, Julian

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .