Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Jewish Women Philosophers of First-Century AlexandriaPhilo's 'Therapeutae' Reconsidered$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Joan E. Taylor

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199291410

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291410.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 April 2020

The Philosophia of Ioudaismos

The Philosophia of Ioudaismos

Chapter:
(p.105) 5 The Philosophia of Ioudaismos
Source:
Jewish Women Philosophers of First-Century Alexandria
Author(s):

Joan E. Taylor (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291410.003.0005

Philo does not expect his audience to think of his philosophers in De Vita Contemplativa as being associated with cultic activities at an actual temple. Instead, he uses them as exemplars of the bios theoretikos, the classic meditative/contemplative life. The Mareotic group are those who truly are ‘the good’, the very image of perfect philosophers. They are explicitly called ‘philosophers’. They are driven by impulses for and trained in philosophy; they live and cultivate a life of philosophy, interpret allegorically the inherited philosophy, and follow the contemplative part of philosophy. Philo jumps from cultic language to philosophical language. This would have seemed perhaps more striking to his audience than to us, for cult and philosophy were two discrete conceptual categories in antiquity. To understand how Philo could make the jump, and how he could expect his audience to do so, we need to look at ‘religion’ as a whole, and basic understandings of Judaism, in the Graeco-Roman world.

Keywords:   Philo, De Vita Contemplativa, philosophy, cult, Judaism, contemplative life, religion

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .