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Making Time for the PastLocal History and the Polis$
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Katherine Clarke

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199291083

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291083.001.0001

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The world outside the polis

The world outside the polis

Chapter:
(p.90) III The world outside the polis
Source:
Making Time for the Past
Author(s):

Katherine Clarke (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291083.003.0003

This chapter explores the expression of time in non-polis historiography in order to highlight distinctive features of city-histories. In particular, it examines the synthetic temporal frameworks and strategies of Olympiadic dating and synchronism which were developed by universal historians, such as Ephorus, Timaeus, Polybius, and Diodorus, to overcome the fact that different poleis had different calendars and different histories. It takes Strabo as an example of an author whose presentation of the past spans both local and universal frameworks. It also looks at the way in which time is configured by Greek authors writing about the non-Greek world in order to discern trends and recurring themes in the treatment of time, which throw into relief the Greek city-histories.

Keywords:   non-polis historiography, synthetic temporal frameworks, Olympiadic dating, synchronism, universal historians, Ephorus, Timaeus, Polybius, Diodorus, Strabo

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