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Blood and Violence in Early Modern France$
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Stuart Carroll

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199290451

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199290451.001.0001

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Honours and Prerogatives

Honours and Prerogatives

Chapter:
(p.60) 3 Honours and Prerogatives
Source:
Blood and Violence in Early Modern France
Author(s):

Stuart Carroll (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199290451.003.0004

Honour was itself measurable by the honours that one had either inherited or had conferred by a superior. Ideally, honours should be commensurate with honour, so that ‘reputation is finally sanctified by the bestowal of honours’. Though competition for office was intense and the struggle for possession the cynosure of factional squabbling, disputes over royal office were not a priori causes of feuds. Honours were naturally sought for material reward, but to claim an office or prerogative was also to claim honour and to deny it to someone else, and thus the victor in the competition for office finds his reputation enhanced by the humiliation of the vanquished. This chapter discusses violence associated with honours and prerogatives in early modern France, hunting as a cornerstone of noble sociability, religious festivals, churches and their furnishings, liturgy as rights of lordship and rights of harmony, and death and burial.

Keywords:   violence, honours, prerogatives, France, feuds, hunting, religious festivals, churches, liturgy, death

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