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Multiculturalism and the Welfare StateRecognition and Redistribution in Contemporary Democracies$
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Keith Banting and Will Kymlicka

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199289172

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199289172.001.0001

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Multiculturalism versus neoliberalism in Latin America

Multiculturalism versus neoliberalism in Latin America

Chapter:
(p.272) 10 Multiculturalism versus neoliberalism in Latin America
Source:
Multiculturalism and the Welfare State
Author(s):

Donna Lee Van Cott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199289172.003.0010

In Latin America, neoliberal retrenchment of the state coincided with the increasing adoption of multiculturalist rights for indigenous peoples, and there has been a vibrant debate about the relationship between these two phenomena. Did the rise of multiculturalism facilitate the rise of neoliberalism, or has multiculturalism provided a platform for resistance to it? This chapter discusses the forces giving rise to both MCPs and neoliberal reforms in Latin America, and the relationship between the coalitions involved in both sets of policy changes. It is shown that the relationship between multiculturalism and neoliberalism depends on the relative strength and cohesion of three key collective actors: neoliberal elites, the electoral left, and indigenous peoples' social movements. The strength of these actors varies over time, and across countries, which allows us to identify the conditions which recognition and redistribution are either mutually supportive or in tension in Latin America. The chapter concludes that the mobilization for indigenous rights has often served as an effective vehicle for building new left-wing coalitions that challenge neoliberalism.

Keywords:   neoliberalism, Latin America, indigenous peoples, social movements, welfare state, social policy

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