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Predicting Party SizesThe Logic of Simple Electoral Systems$
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Rein Taagepera

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199287741

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287741.001.0001

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Openness to Small Parties: The Micro‐Mega Rule and the Seat Product

Openness to Small Parties: The Micro‐Mega Rule and the Seat Product

Chapter:
(p.83) 6 Openness to Small Parties: The Micro‐Mega Rule and the Seat Product
Source:
Predicting Party Sizes
Author(s):

Rein Taagepera (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287741.003.0006

The micro-mega rule says that for representation of small parties, it helps to have large assembly sizes, large district magnitudes, and large quotas or large gaps between divisors in seat allocation formulas. Conversely, large parties would prefer small assemblies, magnitudes and quotas — but only if they are absolutely certain to stay large. Worldwide tendency has been to play it safe and move toward more inclusive representation. The number of parties increases with increasing ‘seat product’ — the number of seats in the assembly times the number of seats in the average district — unless the seats are allocated by plurality in multi-seat districts.

Keywords:   inclusive representation, small parties, assembly size, district magnitude, number of parties, plurality, seat allocation formulas

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