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Predicting Party SizesThe Logic of Simple Electoral Systems$
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Rein Taagepera

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199287741

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287741.001.0001

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Seat Allocation in Federal Second Chambers and the Assemblies of the European Union

Seat Allocation in Federal Second Chambers and the Assemblies of the European Union

Chapter:
(p.255) 16 Seat Allocation in Federal Second Chambers and the Assemblies of the European Union
Source:
Predicting Party Sizes
Author(s):

Rein Taagepera (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287741.003.0016

The number of seats in the European Parliament roughly equals the cube root of the population of the European Union. This theoretically based ‘cube root law of assembly sizes’ also fits most national assemblies, and it could be made the official norm for the EP. Allocation of EP seats and Council of the EU voting weights among member states has for forty years closely approximated the distribution a ‘minority enhancement equation’ predicts, solely on the basis of the number and populations of member states plus the total number of seats/voting weights. This logically founded formula could be made the official norm, so as to save political wrangling. It may also be of use for some other supranational bodies and federal second chambers.

Keywords:   European Parliament, Council of the EU, cube root law, assembly sizes, allocation of EP seats, minority enhancement equation, federal second chambers

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