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The New Old EconomyNetworks, Institutions, and the Organizational Transformation of American Manufacturing$
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Josh Whitford

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199286010

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199286010.001.0001

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It Couldn't Happen Here? Public Policy, Regional Institutions, and Interfirm Collaboration in the United States

It Couldn't Happen Here? Public Policy, Regional Institutions, and Interfirm Collaboration in the United States

Chapter:
(p.129) 6 It Couldn't Happen Here? Public Policy, Regional Institutions, and Interfirm Collaboration in the United States
Source:
The New Old Economy
Author(s):

Josh Whitford (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199286010.003.0010

This chapter argues that the Wisconsin Manufacturers' Development Consortium (WMDC) — a consortium of seven OEMs that formed in 1998 to work jointly with the state's manufacturing modernization service to provide training to suppliers — is suggestive of the sorts of public-private institution building that can both enhance supplier performance and proactively encourage greater collaboration between OEMs and their suppliers. The structure and evolution of this policy experiment show that it is both possible and useful to leverage and strengthen existing partial collaboration between OEMs and suppliers through the construction of CME-style institutions premised on substantial business coordinating capacity.

Keywords:   Wisconsin Manufacturers' Development Consortium, OEM, public-private institution, collaboration, LME, CME

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