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A Stranger in EuropeBritain and the EU from Thatcher to Blair$
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Stephen Wall

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199284559

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199284559.001.0001

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The Dynamics of a Deal

The Dynamics of a Deal

Chapter:
(p.18) 2 The Dynamics of a Deal
Source:
A Stranger in Europe
Author(s):

Stephen Wall

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199284559.003.0002

Britain passed the ten-year mark of European Community (EC) membership in January 1983. The next year and a half were to be the roughest ever in Britain's often tetchy relationship with her partners. One issue dominated the Community's agenda: the British budget rebate. Early in the year, the European Commission, under its President Gaston Thorn, published a Green Paper on EC financing. Most helpful to Britain was the Green Paper's explicit recognition of the need to correct budgetary imbalances. The Stuttgart Declaration was a classic example of the way the EC/European Union has evolved over the years, a brief, relatively peaceful, interlude on the way to the last, fraught, stages of the argument over the EC budget and Britain's contribution to it. The negotiations continued through to 1984. Britain, and Margaret Thatcher in particular, felt they had a lot to contribute.

Keywords:   Britain, European Community, European Union, Margaret Thatcher, Helmut Kohl, Stuttgart Declaration, Francois Mitterrand, budget, international relations, foreign policy

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