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Almsgiving in the Later Roman EmpireChristian Promotion and Practice 313-450$
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Richard Finn OP

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199283606

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199283606.001.0001

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The Promotion of Christian Almsgiving

The Promotion of Christian Almsgiving

Chapter:
(p.116) 4 The Promotion of Christian Almsgiving
Source:
Almsgiving in the Later Roman Empire
Author(s):

Richard Finn Op

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199283606.003.0004

This chapter details the direct and indirect promotion of almsgiving in Christian discourse, especially in sermons where it featured regularly at times when it would be heard by a large number of the faithful. Preaching on almsgiving was more extensive in Lent, but also at times of shortage. In direct promotion or exhortation, all who could, and not only the rich, were encouraged to give alms. Almsgiving was promoted indirectly as it featured in the portrayal of holy men and women, both in sermons, but also in apocryphal texts and saints' lives, where it sometimes served as a marker of orthodoxy. Pagan almsgiving by contrast was not encouraged by sustained promotion.

Keywords:   Acts, attendance, Lent, life, preaching, sermon, Sunday, treatise

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