Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dumb Beasts and Dead PhilosophersHumanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Catherine Osborne

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199282067

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199282067.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 October 2019

On the Notion of Natural Rights: Defending the Voiceless and Oppressed in the Tragedies of Sophocles

On the Notion of Natural Rights: Defending the Voiceless and Oppressed in the Tragedies of Sophocles

Chapter:
(p.162) 7 On the Notion of Natural Rights: Defending the Voiceless and Oppressed in the Tragedies of Sophocles
Source:
Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers
Author(s):

Catherine Osborne (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199282067.003.0007

The chapter asks about the idea of animal rights and seeks to show that talk of ‘natural rights’ in general, where it is coherent at all, is designed to express moral outrage on the part of a third party against the abuse of the vulnerable and voiceless. This being so, it cannot be the case that to have a natural right one must have a voice or language. Quite the reverse is the case. The chapter also shows that the appeal to moral absolutes on behalf of the oppressed in respect of their most basic needs, for which ‘natural rights’ talk is currently the favoured discourse, is a longstanding part of traditional moral thinking and can be traced in the tragedies of Sophocles.

Keywords:   animal rights, language, rights, oppression, declaration of rights

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .