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Gregory of Nyssa, Ancient and (Post)modern$
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Morwenna Ludlow

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199280766

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199280766.001.0001

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Salvation

Salvation

Chapter:
(p.108) 6 Salvation
Source:
Gregory of Nyssa, Ancient and (Post)modern
Author(s):

Morwenna Ludlow (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199280766.003.0007

This chapter explores criticisms and defences of Gregory's soteriology which are less closely connected with his Christology, but all of which have been matters of some controversy: specifically Gregory's analogy of the fish-hook, the concept of cooperation (sunergia), and his idea of universal salvation (apokatastasis). Discussion of the theme of the fish-hook centres on a soteriological idea presented by Gregory in narrative form in his Catechetical Oration. Having already established that humanity was in the power of devil (or death) owing to the Fall, and that God's justice demanded that God should win humankind back through payment of a ransom (Christ) rather than seizing it back by force, Gregory then explains how the devil was deceived into accepting as a ransom a payment which he could not possibly keep.

Keywords:   Gregory of Nyssa, fish-hook, cooperation, universal salvation, soteriology

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