Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Differential Treatment in International Environmental Law$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lavanya Rajamani

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199280704

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199280704.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 March 2020

The Doctrinal Basis for and Boundaries of Differential Treatment in International Environmental Law

The Doctrinal Basis for and Boundaries of Differential Treatment in International Environmental Law

Chapter:
(p.129) 5 The Doctrinal Basis for and Boundaries of Differential Treatment in International Environmental Law
Source:
Differential Treatment in International Environmental Law
Author(s):

Lavanya Rajamani

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199280704.003.0005

The divergence in the culpability and contributions of developing and industrial countries persists and results in the lack of ideological sympathy. The principle of common but differentiated responsibility (CBDR) explains the need for international environmental law to implement differential treatment as it is able to exemplify the attempts in establishing a joint venture despite certain boundaries made by these said countries in hopes of attaining international environmental protection. Through looking into the legal status of the CBDR and extracting both its practical and philosophical bases, this chapter attempts to establish the principle as a doctrinal basis for pursuing differential treatment. Also, it attempts to examine the limits and boundaries to the application of the said principle.

Keywords:   environmental protection, industrial countries, developing countries, international environmental law, differential treatment, differentiated responsibility

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .