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Cultural Responses to the Persian WarsAntiquity to the Third Millennium$
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Emma Bridges, Edith Hall, and P. J. Rhodes

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199279678

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199279678.001.0001

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Images of the Persian Wars in Rome

Images of the Persian Wars in Rome

Chapter:
(p.127) 7 Images of the Persian Wars in Rome
Source:
Cultural Responses to the Persian Wars
Author(s):

Philip Hardie

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199279678.003.0007

This chapter shows that Augustan Rome's use of the Athenian image of the Persian barbarian, especially the Actium–Salamis equation, is an expanded and revised version of an article originally published in Classics Ireland. It shows how complex were the reasons why Augustus — and his poets Horace and Virgil — found in the Persian Wars material which helped in the creation of the new Roman sense of Self, a new identity that became a cultural requirement in the years following the end of the Republic. In particular, the chapter examines how the original Athenian fusion of the Amazonomachy and the Persian Wars narratives provided fresh poetic and ideological impetus in Virgil's treatment of the Camilla story.

Keywords:   Augustus, Rome, Persian barbarian, Classics Ireland, Persian Wars, Homer, Virgil, Amazonomachy

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