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Cultural Responses to the Persian WarsAntiquity to the Third Millennium$
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Emma Bridges, Edith Hall, and P. J. Rhodes

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199279678

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199279678.001.0001

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Enacting History and Patriotic Myth: Aeschylus’ Persians on the Eve of the Greek War of Independence

Enacting History and Patriotic Myth: Aeschylus’ Persians on the Eve of the Greek War of Independence

Chapter:
(p.299) 13 Enacting History and Patriotic Myth: Aeschylus’ Persians on the Eve of the Greek War of Independence
Source:
Cultural Responses to the Persian Wars
Author(s):

GondaVan Steen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199279678.003.0013

This chapter examines the account written by the Comte de Marcellus, a French diplomat in Constantinople, of a reading of Aeschylus' Persians, in ancient Greek, that took place at a literary evening held in that city in the year before the uprising was launched in 1821. Marcellus' memoir describes a group of Greek intellectuals who embodied ‘classical’ nobility coming together to define a new Hellenism, through the regeneration of the spirit and glory of the Persian Wars. Marcellus' writing is dependent partly on the writings of the militant liberal philhellene Chateaubriand, but much more on the inspiration taken from ancient Greece by Greek intellectuals and revolutionaries including Adamantios Koraes, and especially, the Orthodox cleric and pedagogue Konstantinos Oikonomos, who was responsible for proposing the recitation of Persians in the first place.

Keywords:   Comte de Marcellus, Aeschylus, Persians, Persian Wars, Chateaubriand, Adamantios Koraes, Konstantinos Oikonomos

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