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The Field and the ForgePopulation, Production, and Power in the Pre-industrial West$
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John Landers

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199279579

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199279579.001.0001

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The Cost of War: Manpower and Resources

The Cost of War: Manpower and Resources

Chapter:
(p.282) Chapter Twelve The Cost of War: Manpower and Resources
Source:
The Field and the Forge
Author(s):

John Landers (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199279579.003.0012

Rulers who wanted to keep themselves in power needed access to force and this meant recruiting and maintaining sufficient quantities of men with the requisite skills and equipment. The primary constraints on recruitment were economic and financial, rather than demographic, and included the costs necessarily incurred by removing men from the productive labour force. The immediate costs of military activities can be categorised as ‘troop costs,’ which are the costs of raising, training, and equipping soldiers and maintaining them in an adequate condition, ‘operational costs,’ which are the further costs of fielding a force given that it has been raised and equipped, and ‘capital costs,’ which are the additional costs of establishing and maintaining ‘military capital’ like fortifications and warships.

Keywords:   recruitment, social institutions, political institutions, troop costs, operational costs, capital costs, military capital, fortification, warships

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