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Modernizing NatureForestry and Imperial Eco-Development 1800-1950$
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S. Ravi Rajan

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199277964

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199277964.001.0001

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The Contested Legacy

The Contested Legacy

Chapter:
(p.197) 6 The Contested Legacy
Source:
Modernizing Nature
Author(s):

S. RAVI RAJAN

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199277964.003.0006

This chapter summarizes the key findings of the entire study and explores some of its wider implications concerning the contested legacy of colonial eco-development. It argues that forestry as a technology was not merely a product of colonial expediency. On the contrary, it provided a context for colonial politics just as it was shaped and moulded by it. Similarly, colonial foresters were not mere ‘servants of the state’; they were carriers of a culture of technology that had its origins in another setting, even if the imperial context exacerbated the impact of their actions. Moreover, against the backdrop of the debate over whether or not colonial forestry constituted a watershed in the environmental history of the British Empire, it is important to note that scientific forestry, as a regime of resource management, was designed to be a major watershed even in continental Europe, its place of birth.

Keywords:   colonial forestry, eco-development, British Empire

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