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The Architecture of the ImaginationNew Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction$
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Shaun Nichols

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199275731

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199275731.001.0001

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Imagination and Simulation in Audience Responses to Fiction

Imagination and Simulation in Audience Responses to Fiction

Chapter:
(p.41) 3 Imagination and Simulation in Audience Responses to Fiction
Source:
The Architecture of the Imagination
Author(s):

Alvin Goldman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199275731.003.0003

This chapter considers how imagination generates emotion. ‘Supposition-imagination’ (S-imagination) is distinguished from ‘enactment-imagination’ (E-imagination). The former kind of imagination involves entertaining or supposing various hypothetical scenarios; with the latter kind of imagination, one tries to create a kind of facsimile of a mental state. Thus, one might try to create a perception-like state as in visual imagination or motoric imagination. It is argued that this much richer form of imagination generates typical emotional reactions to fiction. Emotional reactions to fiction are generated in several different ways, including a process in which we E-imagine being a hypothetical reader or observer of fact.

Keywords:   supposition-imagination, enactment-imagination, fiction, resonance response

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