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Culture and European Union Law$
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Rachael Craufurd Smith

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199275472

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199275472.001.0001

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From Regional to Global Freedom of Trade in Audio-visual Goods and Services? A Comparison of the Impact on the Audio-visual Sector of the Preferential Trade Zones Established by the European Communities and the World Trade Organization

From Regional to Global Freedom of Trade in Audio-visual Goods and Services? A Comparison of the Impact on the Audio-visual Sector of the Preferential Trade Zones Established by the European Communities and the World Trade Organization

Chapter:
(p.353) 12 From Regional to Global Freedom of Trade in Audio-visual Goods and Services? A Comparison of the Impact on the Audio-visual Sector of the Preferential Trade Zones Established by the European Communities and the World Trade Organization
Source:
Culture and European Union Law
Author(s):

Olaf Weber

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199275472.003.0012

Audio-visual content today is produced in one state and is sold in a different form. Such content may either be distributed as a ‘tangible’ good through DVDs or videos or as an ‘intangible’ service over the internet, or through terrestrial airwaves, or via satellite. Because satellite, broadband, and other such advances in communication technologies have already been developed, certain economic and technological hindrances have become increasingly easy to deal with. Although national legal systems attempt to leave out the competition brought about by foreign services and thereby bind commercial operators to only a single jurisdiction, this still somehow presents obstacles to trade in the audio-visual sector. While certain legal instruments such as the Convention on Transfrontier Television and the International Telecommunications Union partially relieve such problems, the preferential trade zones set by the European Communities and the World Trade Organization bring about the most significant effects in the domestic rules concerning the trade of audio-visual goods and services.

Keywords:   audio-visual content, audi-visual sector, trade, domestic rules, legal instruments, legal systems

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