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Hannah MoreThe First Victorian$
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Anne Stott

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199274888

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199274888.001.0001

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The Blagdon Controversy 1799–1803

The Blagdon Controversy 1799–1803

Chapter:
(p.232) Chapter 11 The Blagdon Controversy 1799–1803
Source:
Hannah More
Author(s):

Anne Stott (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199274888.003.0011

This chapter deals with the most controversial episode in Hannah More's career: her quarrel with Thomas Bere, the curate of Blagdon — over the schoolmaster, Henry Young, who was accused of Methodism. This fed into the anti-Jacobin panic of the 1790s. The controversy was taken up by the Anti-Jacobin Review, which accused More, Wilberforce, and the Clapham sect as being part of a conspiracy to undermine the Church of England. Eventually More was able to win round Richard Beadon, the bishop of Bath and Wells, and though the Blagdon school closed, the others survived. It is argued that to some extent More brought her troubles on her own head by her promotion of Evangelical clergy in ‘her’ parishes. She survived because she managed to win over a significant body of high-church opinion, but after this bruising experience she proceeded more cautiously.

Keywords:   Blagdon Controversy, Methodism, Anti-Jacobin Review, Richard Beadon, high church

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