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The Great Game of GenocideImperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians$
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Donald Bloxham

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199273560

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273560.001.0001

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Interlude: New Minority Questions in the New Near East

Interlude: New Minority Questions in the New Near East

Chapter:
(p.170) Interlude: New Minority Questions in the New Near East
Source:
The Great Game of Genocide
Author(s):

Donald Bloxham

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273560.003.0007

A few months after the signing of the Lausanne Treaty, Mustafa Kemal secured the assent of the Grand National Assembly to alter Turkey's status to that of a republic. The new era brought the intensification of Turkification campaigns affecting Kurds as well as the remnant of Christians. The one area in which Turkey notably failed to progress through its reform programme in the inter-war years was in the realm of democracy, with accountable institutions and cultural and political pluralism lacking, as a series of abortive experiments with freely elected governments illustrated. The persecution and flight of the remaining Christians continued through the 1920s and even into the era of the Second World War. This section shows how the international community responded to the post-genocidal situation, drawing comparisons with attitudes to ‘border adjustment’ in inter-war Europe. It also illustrates how, after the murderous ‘resolution’ of the Ottoman Armenian question, Britain was instrumental in its occupation of Iraq in exacerbating a regional Kurdish question that endures to the present.

Keywords:   Turkey, Mustafa Kemal, Britain, Kurds, Armenian question, Iraq, democracy, Christians, persecution, Europe

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