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The Great Game of GenocideImperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians$
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Donald Bloxham

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199273560

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273560.001.0001

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Imperial Germany:A Case of Mistaken Identity

Imperial Germany:A Case of Mistaken Identity

Chapter:
(p.115) 3 Imperial Germany:A Case of Mistaken Identity
Source:
The Great Game of Genocide
Author(s):

Donald Bloxham

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273560.003.0005

Of the warring European powers, Germany has come in for the harshest criticism concerning its relationship to the genocide. Contrary to traditional diplomatic studies of the Ottoman-German alliance, which have depicted German and Austro-Hungarian misgivings about the deportations simply being outweighed by the interests of the wartime alliance, a number of more recent analyses have suggested active German interest and involvement in the destruction process. Germany was the Ottoman empire's chief ally during the war and had the most extensive influence over Ottoman policies. Given that Germany did not impede the destruction process in any significant way, in addition to its history of advancing its influence in Istanbul by ostentatiously ignoring the massacres of Armenians, there are provisional grounds for particularly condemnatory judgements. This chapter debunks the notion disseminated by a number of historians that Imperial Germany, Turkey's ally in the world conflict, was a co-perpetrator of the genocide. Instead, the German response to the Armenian genocide should be seen as a function of relations with the Committee of Union and Progress and the First World War situation.

Keywords:   Germany, genocide, Turkey, Ottoman empire, massacres, Armenians, deportations, Committee of Union and Progress

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