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The Great Game of GenocideImperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians$
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Donald Bloxham

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199273560

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273560.001.0001

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Introduction: Genocide and the Armenian Case

Introduction: Genocide and the Armenian Case

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction: Genocide and the Armenian Case
Source:
The Great Game of Genocide
Author(s):

Donald Bloxham

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273560.003.0001

The central historical event of this book is the destruction of some one million Armenian Christians under the auspices of the Ottoman empire in 1915–1916. The accompanying analysis seeks to cast new light on the genocide and on the ways it has been reshaped in the political and historical consciousness of the world ever since. During the First World War, the Armenians of eastern Anatolia were either killed in situ, which was the fate of many of the men and male youths, or deported to the deserts of modern-day Iraq or Syria in the south. This book explores the intimate relationship between state intent, contingency, and action from the rise of the Armenian question to its terrible denouement. It debunks the notion disseminated by a number of historians that Imperial Germany, Turkey's ally in the world conflict, was a co-perpetrator of the genocide. It shows how the international community responded to the post-genocidal situation, drawing comparisons with attitudes to ‘border adjustment’ in inter-war Europe.

Keywords:   Armenians, genocide, Ottoman empire, Christians, Anatolia, Armenian question, Germany, Turkey, First World War

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