Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Wars of WordsThe Politics of Language in Ireland 1537-2004$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Tony Crowley

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199273430

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273430.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 06 July 2020

Introduction: Language Acquisition

Introduction: Language Acquisition

Chapter:
(p.1) CHAPTER ONE Introduction: Language Acquisition
Source:
Wars of Words
Author(s):

Tony Crowley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273430.003.0001

This chapter presents the broad outlines of the book by giving specific historical examples of the type of debates under consideration. Working within the broad limits of the field of the politics of language, it introduces central themes which recur: identity, authority, legitimacy, cultural struggle, and political debate. The contradictions of the story are encapsulated in the words of Stephen Dedalus in James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. At one point, Stephen says that English, ‘so familiar and so foreign, will always be for me an acquired speech’. Later, he denounces an Englishman with whom he has had an argument over the meaning of a word, by asking: ‘what did he come here for to teach us his own language or to learn it from us’. Such complexities are explored in this and later chapters.

Keywords:   identity, authority, legitimacy, cultural struggle, political debate, James Joyce

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .