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Charlotte Brontë: The Imagination in History$
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Heather Glen

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199272556

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199272556.001.0001

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The Terrible Handwriting: Shirley

The Terrible Handwriting: Shirley

Chapter:
(p.144) CHAPTER SIX The Terrible Handwriting: Shirley
Source:
Charlotte Brontë: The Imagination in History
Author(s):

Heather Glen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199272556.003.0007

In one sense, the ‘parallels’ between inarticulate private suffering and public official history are writ large in Shirley. This, it has seemed, is Charlotte Brontë's attempt to write a ‘condition-of-England’ novel such as other of her contemporaries were producing in these years. The novel has always refused quite to fit that category. Its narrative focus shifts from one subject to another — the curates and their absurdities; the dispute between masters and men; Robert Moore's entrepreneurial ambitions; the story of Caroline Helstone's lonely decline; the aristocratic heiress, Shirley, her governess and her tutor; the extraordinary Yorke family and their concerns. There are chunks of text in foreign languages, old ballads, hymns, poems, even a school essay, interspersed with extended reflections upon such themes as the effects of the war with France and the sufferings of old maids.

Keywords:   private suffering, Shirley, Charlotte Brontë, novel, narrative, Robert Moore, Caroline Helstone, war, France

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