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Jurists UprootedGerman-Speaking Emigré Lawyers in Twentieth Century Britain$
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Jack Beatson and Reinhard Zimmermann

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199270583

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199270583.001.0001

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Lassa Oppenheim (1858–1919) *

Lassa Oppenheim (1858–1919) *

Chapter:
(p.583) Lassa Oppenheim (1858–1919)*
Source:
Jurists Uprooted
Author(s):

Mathias Schmoeckel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199270583.003.0018

Lassa Oppenheim was born in Windecken near Frankfurt am Main in 1858 and died in Cambridge, England shortly after the end of World War I, in October 1919. In 1878, he started studying law, but also followed courses in metaphysics, psychology, and forensic medicine in order to gain a thorough understanding of jurisprudence. Oppenheim studied in Göttingen, where he learned Roman law, Berlin, and Heidelberg, where he took up a course in international law. After a short time in practice, Oppenheim decided to pursue an academic career, with criminal law as his major subject. By the early 1890s, he had published five books on criminal law, and various articles. Oppenheim had left Imperial Germany with its nationalism and militarism. His upbringing in Frankfurt and his family's commercial background meant that he preferred a liberal atmosphere. In 1895, however, he chose to leave Switzerland and the Continent forever, and moved to London. This chapter presents a biographical sketch of Oppenheim and his work on international law.

Keywords:   Lassa Oppenheim, Germany, émigré legal scholars, criminal law, international law

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