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Jurists UprootedGerman-Speaking Emigré Lawyers in Twentieth Century Britain$
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Jack Beatson and Reinhard Zimmermann

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199270583

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199270583.001.0001

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‘Was Heimat hieß, nun heißt es Hölle’

‘Was Heimat hieß, nun heißt es Hölle’

The Emigration of Lawyers from Hitler's Germany: Political Background, Legal Framework, and Cultural Context*

Chapter:
(p.1) ‘Was Heimat hieß, nun heißt es Hölle’
Source:
Jurists Uprooted
Author(s):

Reinhard Zimmermann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199270583.003.0001

When Adolf Hitler was appointed Chancellor of the German Reich in 1933, he embarked on a campaign to create a considerably greater living space for the German people, of a particularly venomous combination of racism and a militant anti-Semitism. Hitler required a totalitarian system that could be imposed on a homogeneous nation, purged of all inferior elements preventing the progress of what he called the superior Aryan race. He introduced a law ‘on the admission to the legal profession’ that empowered the authorities responsible for the administration of justice to withdraw the admission to legal practice of all ‘non-Aryans’ and those who had been active ‘in the communist cause’. This chapter chronicles the establishment of the Nazi regime in Germany under Hitler that paved the way for totalitarianism, the emancipation and assimilation of Jews in Germany, the rise of German-Jewish lawyers, emigration of lawyers from Germany due to Hitler's oppressive regime, the political and cultural context of the exodus of lawyers to other countries, and political and cultural remigration after Germany lost in World War II.

Keywords:   Germany, Adolf Hitler, lawyers, emigration, remigration, anti-Semitism, Jews, totalitarianism

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