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Reengineering Health CareThe Complexities of Organizational Transformation$
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Terry McNulty and Ewan Ferlie

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199269075

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199269075.001.0001

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Introduction and Key Themes

Introduction and Key Themes

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction and Key Themes
Source:
Reengineering Health Care
Author(s):

Terry McNulty

Ewan Ferlie

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199269075.003.0001

Business Process Reengineering (BPR) was used to implement transformatory change in the Leicester Royal Infirmary, a large National Health Service (NHS) teaching hospital in the UK. This NHS Trust was under pressure to improve performance but at the same time it needed to retain the support of doctors and other health care professionals in achieving these improvements. This programme received support from stable top-level leadership and ‘hybrid’ help from both doctors and managers. This change, however, produced uneven outcomes and required managers to form partnerships with clinicians. This chapter introduces how BPR works and relates this with the limits of organizational transformation. Also, BPR here is presented as an example of process organization and not merely a managerial fad. This chapter generally looks at health care and hospitals from a management perspective.

Keywords:   Business Process Reengineering, NHS, transformatory change, management, health care, clinicians, process organization

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