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Between Enterprise and EthicsBusiness and Management in a Bimoral Society$
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John Hendry

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199268634

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199268634.001.0001

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The Crisis of Morality and the Moral Culture of Contemporary Society

The Crisis of Morality and the Moral Culture of Contemporary Society

Chapter:
(p.148) CHAPTER 6 The Crisis of Morality and the Moral Culture of Contemporary Society
Source:
Between Enterprise and Ethics
Author(s):

John Hendry (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199268634.003.0006

This chapter critically reviews contemporary accounts of the crisis of morality, with particular attention to the arguments of Fukuyama, the free-market critics of the right, arguments concerning the demoralizing effects of technology, and arguments concerning the demoralizing effects of modern society generally. It sets out the idea of a bimoral society, in which traditional morality continued to be meaningful and effective, but sits alongside a socially legitimized morality of self-interest with no clear demarcation between the realms in which these moralities operate. The effects of this bimoral society are explored with reference to conceptions of the self and to the managing of interpersonal relationships.

Keywords:   crisis of morality, demoralization, self-reliance, welfare, Fukuyama, Bauman, Sennett, technology

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