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Agency and ResponsibilityA Common-Sense Moral Psychology$
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Jeanette Kennett

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199266302

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199266302.001.0001

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Moral Failures and Moral Responsibility: Recklessness, Weakness, Compulsion

Moral Failures and Moral Responsibility: Recklessness, Weakness, Compulsion

Chapter:
(p.154) 6 Moral Failures and Moral Responsibility: Recklessness, Weakness, Compulsion
Source:
Agency and Responsibility
Author(s):

Jeanette Kennett

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199266302.003.0006

This chapter argues against Watson's view that those who have the capacity for self-control need not always exercise it. It outlines the criteria for determining whether agents are weak or compulsive, and describes the three varieties of recklessness. The chapter first explores the nature of recklessness, weakness, and compulsion. It argues that though at the periphery of weakness shades into reckless or compulsion, the central cases of each kind of failing are distinct. The chapter also considers how the accounts of evaluation, orthonomy, and control, and the differences between recklessness, weakness, and compulsion, underwrite common-sense allocations of moral responsibility.

Keywords:   recklessness, weakness, compulsion, weak agents, compulsive agents, evaluation, orthonomy, control

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