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News and the British WorldThe Emergence of an Imperial Press System 1876-1922$
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Simon J. Potter

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199265121

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199265121.001.0001

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The Role of Reuters

The Role of Reuters

Chapter:
(p.87) 4 The Role of Reuters
Source:
News and the British World
Author(s):

Simon J. Potter (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199265121.003.0005

This chapter investigates the role of Reuters Telegram Company in transmitting information throughout the world. It discusses that Reuters took advantage of cable telegraph technology to become one of the world's first truly global corporations, and consequently, the company acquired he sole right to collect and sell news in most parts of the British Empire. It explains that the course of events in Australia and New Zealand powerfully illustrates the conflicting commercial interests of Reuters and the large Dominion dailies. It also discusses that Reuters could not sell news directly to the press in Australasian colonies. On the other hand, it narrates that Reuters was allowed to sell British news directly to the Canadian press. It tells that in South Africa, Reuters news was divided into a general service and a special service. It explains that cold commercial realities resulted in a growing spirit of rebellion among the larger papers in South Africa.

Keywords:   Reuters Telegram Company, Australasia, New Zealand, Canada, Canadian press

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